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Hypnosis Explained...



Hollywood is a neighborhood located in Los Angeles, California, that's also synonymous with the glamour, money and power of the entertainment industry. So I can’t help but be amazed at how many things how much confusion has been created by the film making industry to make people believe that most of what is released for entertainment purposes to many becomes reality. Now I understand that in many cases there is some truth but when it comes to Hypnosis what you have been spoon fed is not exactly true. I became a Certified Consulting Hypnotist, well because in Connecticut they feel that you need more licensing and more fees to pay to be an actual Hypnotherapist but a Hypnotherapist is what I am. Although hypnosis and hypnotherapy are words that are used rather interchangeably, the two words are not the same. Hypnosis is more a state of mind while hypnotherapy is the name of the therapeutic version in which hypnosis is used.

So yes, Hypnosis is a state of mind characterized by focused attention and increased receptivity to suggestion. It can be generated by following instructions or accomplished naturally. During hypnosis the mind's critical nature is bypassed and acceptable suggestions are made. Misconceptions about hypnosis by clinicians and their clients have been shaped by inaccurate and interesting depictions of hypnosis in books, plays, and movies. Part of the misconception is that hypnotists are portrayed as individuals with seemingly magical powers who manipulate unsuspecting innocent people with authoritarian voice commands and a keen eye. It provides an overview of traditional and conventional approaches to psychiatric disorders, their strengths and weaknesses, and where hypnosis is used as a complementary or alternative therapy to modern conventional medicine. Despite the silly image of hypnosis and the misconceptions surrounding it, hypnosis still finds many uses in modern medicine. Hypnotherapy, performed by a trained therapist, is seen as a complementary or safe alternative to today's conventional medicine for a variety of ailments.

The word “hypnosis” comes from the Greek word “hypnos”, which means “sleep”. Hypnosis is a state of mind characterized by focused attention and increased receptivity to suggestion. It can be generated by following instructions or accomplished naturally. During hypnosis the mind's critical nature is bypassed and acceptable suggestions are made. It is a trance state followed by suggestion. Suggestion is used during hypnosis to heal many mental health issues such as stress, addictions and phobias. It can also help manage physical problems such as relieving pain for example, Pain caused by chemotherapy in cancer patients.

In trance, normal states of mind occur regularly, such as when watching an enchanting movie, reading an enchanting book, or engaging in a monotonous activity. Hypnosis has also been described as "attentive, receptive concentration". It is generally believed that the subconscious mind is in a suggestible state during hypnosis, while the conscious mind is distracted or lulled into dormancy.

Misconceptions about hypnosis by clinicians and their clients have been shaped by years of inaccurate and interesting depictions of hypnosis in books, plays, and movies. Part of the misconception is that hypnotists are portrayed as individuals with seemingly magical powers who manipulate unsuspecting innocent people with authoritarian voice commands and a keen eye. For these reasons, witch doctors, evil scientists, aliens, and vampires have all been portrayed as using hypnosis to achieve dubious ends. Hypnosis is featured as a form of entertainment on television talk shows and comedy clubs. Audience volunteers act out fantasies that make the audience laugh with a hypnotist's simple sleep commands and finger snaps. A hypnotized individual appears to act in ways that are contrary to normal or atypical behavior. However, some clinicians themselves have contributed to further reinforcing this slanderous image of hypnosis.

In general, calmness is obtained during meditation, which can be compared to hypnosis. Meditation can be considered hypnosis depending on the state reached. Especially when suggestions are made to achieve the desired effect. However, while meditation can be done on your own, hypnosis can of course occur without formal induction.

Focusing attention by attempting to relax and focus the mind is the beginning of both meditation and hypnosis. Breathing is the main focus of most modern meditators. Staring at a point or watching a pendulum swing are hypnotic ways to focus and stay focused. Many types of meditation, such as Buddhism, Hinduism, Christianity, and Judaism, emphasize the release and concentration of thoughts, such as the attention-focusing technique in hypnosis. Meditation, especially the Buddhist type, usually involves the practice of mindfulness. Concentration practice unleashes thought, focuses attention, and transfers it to more subtle experiences. Participants in mindfulness meditation are trained to describe their mental states and activities in great detail, observing rapidly changing panoramas of thoughts, emotions and sensations. Concentration and mindfulness are cultivated and work synergistically. Concentration is ancient Buddhism related to language, leading to altered states of consciousness and striving for stillness. One of them at least resembles deep sleep. With increasing depth, cognitive, emotional, and motivational changes indicate an altered state called absorption. Mindfulness aims at altered states of consciousness and provides insight by observing one's own mental processes. In behavioral medicine and pain management programs, Vipassana meditation has been used to teach patients how to reduce their reactions by objectifying their senses. Observations of one's own mental processes have been relatively neglected in hypnotic research, despite the fact that altered states are usually first identified through subjective experience.

Hypnotic induction is the first process a hypnotist uses to put a client into a trance that is more open to suggestion. Tools or techniques used in inducing hypnosis include:

Relaxation method is one of the common techniques used by therapists is relaxation. Relaxed clients can enter a trance state and their minds are open to suggestion. Relaxed clients are more likely to talk to their therapists and are open to indirect suggestions. Some common mitigation methods are:

Make the client comfortable, lie down, count down the client's head, control their breathing, relax and tense their muscles, and speak in a soft tone.

Visualization techniques can induce both trance and suggestion. For example, the subject can be asked to recall a familiar space in order to imagine every detail of that space, such as windows, floors, lighting, walls, paintings, etc. Move. Their minds are open to suggestions, as subjects have trouble remembering exact details. Visualization can be used to recall positive memories and positive images and experiences (weddings, birthdays, graduations) to change perceptions of negative images. Controlled breathing is used in meditation and also works as a simple form of self-hypnosis.


Here are the steps:


  • Sit up straight in a chair with your eyes closed and your arms on your knees.

  • Inhale deeply through your nose and exhale through your mouth.

  • Use slow, controlled breathing while counting down from 100.

  • Each exhalation he counts as one interval. You may go into a trance. If not, continue the exercise and count down from a higher number.


Hypnotic suggestion


Actions that you want the client to perform are called suggestions. Post-hypnotic suggestions are provided after the hypnotized person enters a trance state (a state in which the subject is more susceptible).

In the late 1700s, when effective pharmaceutical and surgical treatment options were limited, hypnosis became a popular approach to treating medical conditions [6]. As alternative treatments for conditions become more common, modern medicine is being challenged to take a more integrative approach. It is used for conditions such as phobias, attention deficit disorder, and many of the symptoms mentioned may have a psychological basis.

Hypnosis is used effectively in many medical fields, including chronic pain management, labor, surgery, and dentistry. Several studies have reported its effectiveness in treating anxiety disorders. Hypnosis has been used as an adjunct to cognitive behavioral therapy for a variety of problems. Cognitive-behavioral therapy combined with hypnosis has been used to treat anxiety disorders, pain, depression, smoking cessation, obesity, and hypertension.

In 1958 the American Medical Association and in 1960 the American Psychological Association approved the use of hypnotherapy as adjunctive therapy. Its efficacy has been demonstrated in a variety of mental and physical conditions. Modern applications of clinical hypnosis are likely to lie primarily in four main areas following him. Behavior, psychology, medicine, self-development. Modern medical uses of hypnosis include medicine, surgery, and dentistry, with uses affecting physical and behavioral aspects of disease. Traditional hypnosis approaches are used to treat anxiety, depression, phobias, and attention deficit disorders, but in mainstream medicine today, modern or conventional approaches in clinical hypnosis are used to treat adjunctive, complementary, or used as an alternative therapy.


Treating anxiety disorders with hypnosis


A 1996 National Institutes of Health Technical Review Board report reviewed effective and viable solutions for managing pain associated with cancer and many other chronic pain conditions. Hypnotherapy for anxiety relief has been reported to be effective for acute pain, analgesia, and vomiting. Brugnoli et al. also reported the efficacy of hypnosis for anxiety management as an adjunctive therapy for patients receiving palliative care for chronic illness.


Hypnosis for Smoking


Hypnosis has been used as a complementary cognitive-behavioral therapy for smoking cessation. A combination of hypnotherapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy for smoking cessation has been found to be superior to waiting-list control conditions. In 1988, these results were reproduced in a study comparing larger sample sizes under the same conditions.


Treatment of impotence


The powerful potential of hypnosis to treat impotence has been described in the medical literature since the 1960s, and recent clinical studies have supported this claim. An 88% success rate in using hypnosis for impotence has been reported in nearly 3000 patients. Hypnosis and acupuncture have a 75% success rate for treating impotence.


Applications of Hypnosis in Clinical Pain Treatment